Business & Government Interpreting

Business & Government interpreting for meetings, appointments, consultations, presentations, and more!

american sign language event interpreting

Business & Government Interpreting

No matter your NYC borough, our professional sign language interpreters are available to travel to your location to ensure your personal, effective, and efficient communication.

Never worked with an interpreter before? Don’t sweat it! We’ve included some helpful tips to ensure your inclusive experience goes smoothly. Still anxious? Reach out to a coordinator or ADA-specialist to ask a question or discuss how to prepare for your appointment.

Tips for Working with Event Interpreters

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    Request an ASL event interpreter as soon as the event is confirmed. You are able to cancel most appointments 48-72 hours before the request date, so do not hesitate to request an interpreter early in your planning. On the other hand, waiting to submit an interpreter request significantly lowers the possibility of confirming a qualified interpreter and carries increased rates.

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    Anticipate the interpreter arriving 10-20 minutes prior to your request. Ensure the interpreter has all necessary parking and security clearances so they are not delayed in arriving.

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    Be prepared to provide the interpreter a brief synopsis of your agenda as well as any documents or industry-specific vocabulary you plan to reference during your request. If you have a prepared speech or PowerPoint, ensure to send this to an ICS coordinator at least one week in advance.

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    Allow the interpreter to be positioned near the primary speaker, or if multiple speakers, ensure the interpreter is positioned to see all participants. Avoid placing the interpreter in front of a bright background such as a window or lamp.

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    If you intend to show a video, ensure you have captions “on” or notify the interpreter in advance if captions are unavailable. Ensure the interpreter is well lit so they may interpret in lieu of captions. Ideally limit interpreted media to 15 minutes as it is fatiguing for Deaf and hard-of-hearing participants to follow two sources of information.

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    For large venues, allow the Deaf person(s) to elect where they would like to sit and where they would prefer the interpreter stationed.

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    Request that participants speak clearly and one at a time. Avoid speaking with your back to Deaf or hard-of-hearing participants. Repeat questions or comments made out of sight of the Deaf or hard-of-hearing participant and clarify who the speaker was if possible.

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    Allow enough time for participants to take notes or turn to an instructed page. Deaf and hard-of-hearing participants cannot look two places at once, so it is best to wait for the participants’ attention before continuing.

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    Be patient when soliciting questions or responses from participants as the interpreter may be as much as 5 seconds behind the pace of talk.

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    Ensure you look directly at the Deaf and hard-of-hearing participants when engaging with them. Avoid looking at the interpreter and be patient before interrupting them while working. It is not necessary to introduce interpreters unless desired.

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    Respect the interpreter’s scheduled time. Freelance interpreters provide services for multiple requests every day. Holding an interpreter past your confirmed time postpones their schedule and results in additional invoice charges.