Deaf-Blind Tactile Interpreting

Our interpreters are trained in a variety of tactile, low-vision, and haptic (touch-signal) techniques.

tactile interpreting

Deaf-Blind Tactile Interpreting

Our interpreters are trained in a variety of tactile, low-vision, and haptic (touch-signal) techniques.

Trained in a variety of tactile, low-vision, and haptic (touch-signal) techniques, our interpreters have just the right “touch” for your Deaf-blind interpreting needs.

Never worked with an interpreter before? Don’t sweat it! We’ve included some helpful tips to ensure your inclusive experience goes smoothly. Still anxious? Reach out to a coordinator or ADA-specialist to ask a question or discuss how to prepare for your appointment.

Tips for Working with Interpreters and Deaf-Blind Consumers

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    Ask the Deaf-blind individual what their preferred communication method is. Not all hearing- and vision-loss is the same – there is a variety of Deaf blind tactile interpreting methods, so do not hesitate to inquire if the individual uses speech or signs, prefers tactile interpreting, close-vision interpreting, haptic sign language, or touch signals. If you are unsure, let an ICS coordinator know.

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    Prepare the requested space to accommodate the Deaf-blind individual. Notify any secretarial or security personnel before the individual’s arrival, and request someone to escort the individual to their destination if they arrive without a Special Support Provider (SSP). Ensure a clear walking path in the environment and minimize strong fragrances such as colognes, air fresheners, or body odor.

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    Respect the Deaf-blind individual’s independence and decisions. If an individual elects to navigate an environment alone, allow them. If they request your navigation assistance, allow the individual to grab the back of your forearm or shoulder for you to guide. Alert the individual of any steps or obstacles as you guide them.

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    Be courteous and provide visual information to Deaf-blind participants. While interpreters work hard to pass along visual information, such cues can often be lost in prioritization of spoken information. As an assist, provide a braille or spoken description of any presentation visuals, physical humor, the room setup, and where participants are seated.

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    Be accommodating to both the interpreter’s and the Deaf-blind participant’s requests for changing the environment, media, or positioning to improve the tactile interpreting experience.