Theatrical Interpreting

ASL interpreted performance can ensure your audience’s synonymous understanding.

theatrical interpreting

 

Theatrical Interpreting

For that important event you wish to provide equal communication access to, our sign language interpreters come prepared to ensure your audience’s synonymous understanding.

Never worked with an interpreter before? Don’t sweat it! We’ve included some helpful tips to ensure your inclusive experience goes smoothly. Still anxious? Reach out to a coordinator or ADA-specialist to ask a question or discuss how to prepare for your appointment..

Tips for Working with Event Interpreters

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    Determine the date of the production or event for which you would like to have theatrical interpreting. This may be the date a Deaf or hard-of-hearing attendee has requested interpreters or a date you choose to make your event openly-accessible to the community. Due to the lengthy preparation required for a sign language interpreted show, requests should be submitted no later than 2-weeks prior to the event date; however, additional notice allows for better interpreter selection and more affordable rates.

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    Confirm the performance length, logistics of the space, and any open rehearsals with an ICS coordinator. . Be prepare to send event agendas or materials such as scripts, rehearsal dates, list of character names, music set, or more to aid the preparation of the interpreters.

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    Select an on-site contact person (POC) to coordinate the interpreters’ setup. materials, lighting, and other needs. This is traditionally a stage manager or event coordinator but may be anyone who will be on site the day of the performance. The POC should be prepared to attend to the interpreters for any last minute needs or changes.

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    Entrust ICS coordinators with the “behind the scenes” details. On the day of the sign language interpreted performance, your interpreters will arrive early to meet the POC and set up for the performance. An ICS coordinator will be in touch in advance to discuss interpreter placement, lighting, and equipment, depending on the type of performance.

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    If there is an intermission or break within the performance, please designate a space for the interpreters to take a break. Theatrical interpreting is a lot of work! Interpreters will need to rest their hands and minds; re-nourish with snacks and water; and discuss their work together apart from attendees. Having the option to go back stage during breaks is always appreciated.